This and That…

First… another wonderful sunset on the 27th:

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Rainfall was spotty over the last week, but some places did end up with a good amount.  Okarche was on the lower end of things coming in at 0.58 of an inch.  Northwest Oklahoma missed out the most:

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After a long stretch of warm weather, where 34 of 37 days saw above normal temperatures (May 22 – June 27) – we managed to put together a couple of very nice days.  The high temperature on the 28th and 29th stayed below 90 degrees in Okarche, and more important, dew point temperature fell to as low as 50 degrees.

Light winds, dry air and mild temperatures made for a couple of incredible evenings.  We added some of the seasons first fireworks to the mix at the BBQ on the 28th:

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The heat took its toll on the peas, beans and herbs, but otherwise the garden has been producing nicely:

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Elsewhere… I don’t usually post up work by others here, but Skip Talbot posted up some time lapse video of a Minnesota tornado event (June 17, 2010) that was amazing!  The video is over six minutes long, but well worth the time to check out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=raoJU-OevN0&feature=player_embedded

Finally… the first Hurricane of the Atlantic 2010 season is Alex.  With a pressure of 28.32 inches and 80 M.P.H. winds… the eye is now evident this morning about 187 Nautical Miles southeast of the Brownsville, Texas radar site:

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Heat and Thunder… likely and possible…

Let the fun begin.  June 22nd marks the first day that the record high temperature in Okarche is 100 degrees or higher – for 78 straight days.  It only makes sense that we are pushing 100 degrees on the 23rd.

There is also a slight risk of severe thunderstorms this evening as a front has pushed into the northwest part of the state.  While little in the way of upward forcing exists – other than frontal convergence and surface heating… this should still be sufficient for the development of isolated storms.

Any storms that do form will likely produce marginally severe hail and strong gusty winds.  There will also be the potential for heat bursts when the storms rapidly weaken late this evening.

Once considered rare… the occurrence of heat bursts seem to be more common than once thought.  A heat burst is characterized by strong winds and a rapid increase in temperature and decrease in dew point.  It is theorized that a heat burst is caused when rain evaporates into a parcel of dry air high in the atmosphere making the air denser than its surroundings.  The parcel descends rapidly, warming due to compression, overshoots its equilibrium level and reaches the surface.

One of the most important aspects of getting a heat burst is getting a thunderstorm to form in the first place.  If storms do form this evening… heat bursts will be possible.  Time will tell…

- NO SEVERE WEATHER EXPECTED -

Well, I’ve decided to bring the daily Severecast to a halt… simply because there doesn’t look to be a significant severe threat for the remainder of the month.  That’s stretching things out a bit, but there have been no signals of the storm track returning to the state in the near future.  Severe weather looks to be making a regular appearance in the central and northern plains, and there will no doubt be an isolated thunderstorm capable of a severe event or two in Oklahoma (primarily the panhandle and far west) – but until a substantial threat shows itself, we may as well put the project to rest.

What may be an appropriate way to wind down the Oklahoma portion of the severe weather season is a nice sunset.  For anyone around here that didn’t get to see tonight’s… it was incredible!

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SEVERECAST DAY 111 – 7:00 a.m., SATURDAY, JUNE 19

…NO ORGANIZED SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS FORECAST…

AN UPPER LEVEL HIGH PRESSURE AREA WILL REMAIN SOUTHEAST OF OKLAHOMA THROUGH THE PERIOD… WITH STRONGER SOUTHWESTERLY FLOW TO THE NORTHWEST.

THE ATMOSPHERE ACROSS THE STATE WILL BE WARM.. MOIST AND UNSTABLE TODAY BUT WITH LITTLE IN THE WAY OF ANY FEATURES TO FOCUS LIFT.  THE EXCEPTION WILL ONCE AGAIN BE THE PANHANDLE WHERE A DRY LINE WILL BE FOUND THIS AFTERNOON.

A FEW ISOLATED THUNDERSTORMS ARE POSSIBLE FROM WESTERN KANSAS INTO WESTERN TEXAS WHERE LOCALIZED AREAS OF CONVERGENCE AND INTENSE HEATING CAN OVERCOME THE STRONG CAPPING WHICH IS IN PLACE.

ANY STORMS THAT DO FORM WILL HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO PRODUCE HAIL AND DAMAGING WINDS.  THE CHANCE FOR ANY ONE SPOT ALONG THE LONG DRY LINE TO EXPERIENCE THUNDERSTORMS IS QUITE SMALL.

ON THIS DATE IN 1953… TWO WEAK TORNADOES FORMED IN WOODS COUNTY AROUND LUNCH TIME.  THE DINNER TIME TORNADOES WOULD TAKE PLACE IN SOUTHWEST OKLAHOMA IN STEPHENS AND GRADY COUNTIES WHERE ONE PERSON WAS INJURED.

SEVERECAST DAY 110 – 7:00 a.m., FRIDAY, JUNE 18

…NO ORGANIZED SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS EXPECTED…

AN UPPER LEVEL HIGH PRESSURE AREA OVER SOUTHEAST TEXAS WILL BUILD TOWARD OKLAHOMA WHILE THE MAIN STORM TRACK REMAINS WELL TO OUR NORTH AND NORTHWEST.

AS WAS THE CASE YESTERDAY…A DRY LINE WILL BE FOUND THIS AFTERNOON NEAR THE WESTERN END OF THE OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE.  CONVERGENCE AND STRONG HEATING THIS AFTERNOON WILL CAUSE ISOLATED THUNDERSTORMS TO FORM FROM KANSAS SOUTHWARD TO THE TEXAS PANHANDLE.  SUSTAINED, VIGOROUS UPDRAFTS WILL BE CAPABLE OF PRODUCING GUSTY WINDS AND SMALL HAIL.  HOWEVER… OVERALL THREAT IS TOO SMALL TO OUTLINE.

ON THIS DATE IN 1973…”IT COULD HAVE BEEN MUCH WORSE.”  SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS STARTING PRODUCING TORNADOES JUST AFTER 4:30 P.M. FROM THE NORTHEAST TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE STATE.  A LARGE F3 TORNADO MOVED THROUGH FREDERICK IN TILLMAN COUNTY.  THE TORNADO PASSED JUST SOUTH OF THE TOWN CENTER.  LOSSES TOTALED THREE MILLION DOLLARS AS 13 HOMES WERE DESTROYED AND 63 WERE DAMAGED.  MANY BUSINESSES WERE TORN APART, AND MOST OF THE 58 INJURED WERE AT A NURSING HOME.  LUCKILY, NOBODY WAS KILLED.

SEVERECAST DAY 109 – 7:00 a.m., THURSDAY, JUNE 17

…NO SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS FORECAST…

STRONG UPPER SYSTEM IS FORECAST TO MOVE FROM THE NORTHERN ROCKIES INTO THE NORTHERN PLAINS DURING THE PERIOD… WHILE AN UPPER HIGH MOVES NORTHWARD OUT OF THE WESTERN GULF OF MEXICO.

A SURFACE TROUGH/DRY LINE WILL BE FOUND IN THE PANHANDLE THIS AFTERNOON… MOIST SOUTH WINDS WILL PREVAIL ACROSS THE STATE EAST OF THIS FEATURE.

WHILE THE ATMOSPHERE WILL BECOME FAIRLY UNSTABLE ACROSS THE STATE TODAY… LITTLE IN THE WAY OF FORCING WILL PREVENT ORGANIZED THUNDERSTORM DEVELOPMENT.

A COUPLE OF DRY LINE STORMS ARE POSSIBLE FROM WESTERN KANSAS TO THE TEXAS PANHANDLE… IF THESE DEVELOP… STRONG GUSTY WINDS AND SOME HAIL ARE LIKELY.  THESE ARE EXPECTED TO REMAIN VERY ISOLATED.

ON THIS DATE IN 1935…TWO EARLY AFTERNOON TORNADOES IN EASTERN OKLAHOMA INJURED SIX PEOPLE.  THE MOST SIGNIFICANT TORNADO WAS NEARLY 500 YARDS WIDE AS IT MOVED ACROSS THE NORTHERN SIDE OF THE MUSKOGEE BUSINESS DISTRICT.  SEVERAL HOMES WERE DESTROYED.  ANOTHER TORNADO MOVED SOUTHEAST THROUGH A RESIDENTIAL AREA OF SALLISAW.

SEVERECAST DAY 108 – 7:00 a.m., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16

…ISOLATED SEVERE EVENTS POSSIBLE IN OKLAHOMA TODAY…

NO ORGANIZED SEVERE WEATHER IS EXPECTED.  A STRONG UPPER SYSTEM OVER THE WESTERN U.S. WILL REMAIN TO THE NORTHWEST OF OKLAHOMA.  MID LEVEL FLOW OF ABOUT 20 KNOTS WILL BE FOUND OVER THE STATE THROUGH THE PERIOD.

THE SURFACE PATTERN OVER THE STATE IS SOMEWHAT DISORGANIZED… HOWEVER STRONG SOUTH WINDS WILL EVENTUALLY DEVELOP OVER THE WEST AND PANHANDLE.  AN EXCESSIVE AMOUNT OF MOISTURE REMAINS ACROSS THE STATE AND WITH AFTERNOON HEATING… THE ATMOSPHERE WILL BECOME MODERATELY UNSTABLE.

THUNDERSTORMS WHICH HAVE MOVED OUT OF THE TEXAS PANHANDLE AND INTO WESTERN OKLAHOMA ARE QUITE STRONG.  THEY HAVE HAD A HISTORY OF PRODUCING WINDS OVER 60 MPH IN THE OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE EARLIER.  WITH THE LOW LEVEL JET STRENGTHENING OVER THE NEXT FEW HOURS… THERE IS THE POTENTIAL THAT ISOLATED SEVERE REPORTS MAY OCCUR.  WITH GENERALLY WEAK SHEAR… OVERALL NUMBER OF REPORTS SHOULD BE LIMITED.

ON THIS DATE IN 1935…AN EVENING THUNDERSTORM THAT FORMED IN ROGER MILLS COUNTY DESTROYED BARNS JUST NORTH OF CHEYENNE.  THE TORNADO IS CONSIDERED F2 IN STRENGTH.  NOBODY WAS INJURED.

SEVERECAST DAY 107 – 7:00 a.m., TUESDAY, JUNE 15

…NO SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS EXPECTED…

SHORT WAVE TROUGH OVER THE NORTHERN PLAINS WILL MOVE INTO THE GREAT LAKES REGION TODAY.  MEANWHILE, A STRONG STORM OVER NORTHWEST WASHINGTON THIS MORNING WILL MOVE SOUTHEASTWARD INTO OREGON.  FOR OKLAHOMA, MID LEVEL WINDS WILL BE OUT OF THE WEST OR SOUTHWEST AND GENERALLY LIGHT.

AT THE SURFACE… WINDS THAT ARE LIGHT AND VARIABLE THIS MORNING ARE BEING INFLUENCED BY REMAINING BOUNDARIES ASSOCIATED WITH PREVIOUS CONVECTION.  SURFACE WINDS SHOULD RETURN TO THE SOUTH ACROSS MOST OF THE STATE BY THIS AFTERNOON.

WHILE MOST OF THE STATE SHOULD SEE FAIRLY STABLE CONDITIONS TODAY, THE OKLAHOMA AND TEXAS PANHANDLE AS WELL AS SOUTHWEST KANSAS SHOULD SEE STRONG SURFACE HEATING AND THE ATMOSPHERE BECOMING MODERATELY UNSTABLE.  A FEW SCATTERED THUNDERSTORMS WILL BE POSSIBLE AND GIVEN THE AMOUNT OF INSTABILITY, A FEW OF THESE COULD BRIEFLY BECOME SEVERE.  LACK OF SUFFICIENT SHEAR PRECLUDES A RISK OF ORGANIZED SEVERE STORMS.

ON THIS DATE IN 1955…24 HOURS AFTER A TORNADO DID CONSIDERABLE DAMAGE WEST OF SNYDER… A LARGE TORNADO MOVED OUT OF THE TEXAS PANHANDLE PASSING NEAR SHATTUCK AND ARNETT.  THIS TORNADO WAS NEARLY ½ MILE WIDE AND 25 MILES LONG.

Major flash flood event in OKC; June 14, 2010

For a variety of reasons, there was no time for a SEVERECAST on the 13th or 14th.  Before resuming on the 15th, I will post this concerning the flash flooding event that occurred in the Oklahoma City metro area.

One of the more serious flash flooding events in Oklahoma City’s history took place starting just before sunrise on the 14th and continuing through most of the day.  Very heavy rain associated with thunderstorms formed just west of Oklahoma City and moved east before stalling directly over the city.  For several hours, storms would form near the northeast corner of Grady County and then track northeastward over repeated areas in the metro area.  Before it was over… some places measured a staggering 11+ inches of rainfall.  As of this posting, there have not been any fatalities reported in Oklahoma City, but the damages from yet another wild weather event area likely to be extreme.

As is typically the case with extreme weather events, some areas received little in the way of heavy rain a short distance from areas that had significant flooding.  On the map provided, Okarche was one of the lowest amounts with less than an inch.

From the National Weather Service:

RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NORMAN OK
1210 AM CDT TUE JUN 15 2010

...NEW DAILY RECORD RAINFALL AT OKLAHOMA CITY...

7.38 INCHES OF RAIN FELL AT WILL ROGERS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT ON MONDAY JUNE 14TH. THIS BREAKS THE DAILY RAINFALL RECORD FOR THIS DATE IN JUNE. THE PREVIOUS RECORD WAS 3.95 INCHES SET IN 1930.

THIS ALSO BREAKS THE CALENDAR-DAY RAINFALL RECORD FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE AT WILL ROGERS AIRPORT. THE OLD RECORD OF 6.75 INCHES WAS SET ON JUNE 3RD 1932.

WEATHER RECORDS FOR OKLAHOMA CITY DATE BACK TO 1890.

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